Chapecoense air crash: Colombia plane ‘ran out of fuel’

Media captionThe recording captures the final moments of the plane before it crashed

Colombian authorities say evidence is growing that a plane carrying a Brazilian football team crashed because it ran out of fuel as it tried to land.

The plane had no fuel on impact, an official said, corroborating audio of the pilot asking to land because of a fuel shortage and electric failure.

The capital Bogota was mentioned on the flight plan as a possible refuelling stop, but the plane did not land there.

The plane plunged into a mountainside near Medellin late on Monday.

Only six of the 77 people on board the plane survived.

“Having been able to do an inspection of all of the remains and parts of the plane, we can affirm clearly that the aircraft did not have fuel at the moment of impact,” civil aviation chief Alfredo Bocanegra told a news conference.

Freddy Bonilla, another aviation official, said regulations stipulated that aircraft must have 30 minutes of fuel in reserve to reach an alternative airport in an emergency, but “in this case the plane did not have” it.

“The engines are the electrical source… but without fuel, obviously the electrical source would have been completely lost,” he added.

In a leaked tape, the pilot can be heard warning of a “total electric failure” and “lack of fuel”. Just before the tape ends, he says he is flying at an altitude of 9,000ft (2,745m).

The plane was carrying the Brazilian football team Chapecoense, who had been due to play a cup final against Atletico Nacional in Medellin on Wednesday evening.

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Reuters

Image caption

Fans gathered at Atletico Nacional stadium in Medellin the evening the match was due to be played

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Many Chapecoense fans were in tears at their stadium in Chapeco, Brazil

The team flew from Sao Paulo to Santa Cruz on a commercial flight, then switched to the chartered aircraft.

Brazil’s O Globo reported that because of a delayed departure, a refuelling stop in Cobija – on the border between Brazil and Bolivia – was abandoned because the airport did not operate at night.

The pilot had the option to refuel in Bogota, but headed straight to Medellin.

Media captionRichard Westcott reports from a ‘black box’ investigation centre in the UK

“The pilot was the one who took the decision,” Gustavo Vargas, a representative of Lamia, which operated the plane, was quoted as saying in Bolivian newspaper Pagina Siete. “He thought the fuel would last.”

Approaching Medellin, the pilot asked for permission to land because of fuel problems, without making a formal distress call.

But another plane from airline VivaColombia had priority because it had already suffered a fuel leak, the co-pilot of another plane in the air at the time said.

The pilot of the crashed plane is heard asking urgently for directions to the airport before the audio recording ends.

Officials say the plane’s “black boxes”, which record flight details, will be sent to the UK to be opened by investigators. A full investigation into the crash is expected to take months.


Unanswered questions – by Richard Westcott, BBC’s transport correspondent

There are some critical questions investigators need to answer.

If the plane did indeed run out of fuel, why didn’t the crew fill up en route, as was reportedly planned?

And why wasn’t it carrying the required 30-minute fuel reserve? Or maybe it was, and there was a fuel leak somewhere.

Also, why was the aircraft told to circle while another flight with a problem was given priority to land? Did the crew make it clear to the ground that they had a crisis on their hands?

Looking at the radar track, it appears to circle for around 13 minutes. Yet it was only around three or four minutes flying time from the airport.

Accidents normally come down to a series of problems and decisions that add up to catastrophe. There are often moments, with hindsight, where a tragedy could have been averted.

We still don’t have an official explanation yet. So, there may be facts or problems yet to come out that put a totally different complexion on what happened.


On Wednesday night, when the match had been due to take place, tens of thousands of fans gathered at the Medellin stadium – and at Chapecoense’s home ground in Chapeco – to pay tearful tributes.

Many wore white and carried candles as a mark of respect. Chapecoense lost 19 players in the crash. Twenty journalists were also killed.

Of the survivors, Chapecoense said that two players remained in a critical but stable condition, while the club’s goalkeeper had had one leg amputated and might still lose his other foot.

An injured journalist also remained in critical condition, the club said.

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Cruisin’ Connecticut – Toying Around for 76 Years at Amato’s in Middletown

MIDDLETOWN, Conn. (WTNH) – Today we’re Cruisin’ Connecticut to Middletown, home for 76 years to Amato’s Toy Hobby on Main Street. With holiday shopping in full swing, why not shop local for a toy or two?

The toy shop was started in 1940 by then teenager Vincent Amato, selling wooden model airplanes. The family business is now run by Vincent’s daughter Diane Gervais, who earned her first paycheck from the toy store at 5 years old.

I asked her if she’s still excited today to work in the toy store as she was as a little girl:

I’m more excited I think. More? Yeah, right now while we’re speaking, UPS is at the back door and I’m wondering what’s in the boxes.

I guess you never grow up. Running a toy store… tough gig. But someone has to do it!

From Playmobil, to RC cars, to drones and model trains, there is something for children (and adults) or all ages! Family games are big this year, with kids glued to their smartphones, many parents are trying to revive the “game nights” that they grew up with!

When you walk downstairs at Amato’s you’ll be taken aback by “Train Land.” It’s an incredible collection of train sets, antique train cars, and sights and sounds that’ll bring you to a place of nostalgia.

So if you’re still in need of those unique holiday gifts, stop by Amato’s at: 395 Main St, Middletown, CT 06457

Also check their website for the “Train Land” hours of operation.

Know of cool people, places or events to check out for “Cruisin’ Connecticut?” Email me, or let me know on: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Snapchat: @RyanKristafer

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Menlo Park running out of money to operate Bedwell Bayfront Park

Menlo Park’s largest park is poised for some major changes.

The city intends to develop a master plan for Bedwell Bayfront Park that will plot out improvements for the next 25 years.

Friends of Bedwell Bayfront Park, a community group that formed in 2005 to fend off construction of a golf course at the park, wants Bedwell maintained as a passive recreation area. It also is pushing for the return of a ranger to enforce a recent city ban on drones at parks and to crack down on other illegal and dangerous activities. The group also would like Bedwell’s trails improved and a docent brought in to lead tours through the wildlife refuge that borders it on three sides.

Residents who live near the 160-acre park along the Bay say they want to see all that too, plus some extra benches, a learning center, a rebuilt restroom and maintenance of the Great Spirit Path — a Native American-inspired rock sculpture designed by Menlo Park artist Susan Dunlap.

Meanwhile, members of the Academy of Model Aeronautics would like the city to exempt from the drone ban some types of radio-controlled model aircraft, particularly gliders, which one member likened to kites with radio signals. The park hosts an annual kite day.

In October, the City Council authorized spending $200,000 from the 2016-17 capital improvement budget to develop the master plan.

Azalea Mitch, Menlo Park’s senior civil engineer, said the city is pursuing a master plan to “help identify approaches we should be following to make sure we don’t miss (funding) opportunities. … The park has become very popular. It needs care and the funds are not there.”

The city is seeking bids for the master plan work until Dec. 12.  Assistant Community Services Director Derek Schweigart said if the city awards a contract this month, the master plan could be in place by early 2018. It wouldn’t require an environmental review unless major changes are proposed.

Other possible changes mentioned in the bidding documents include park information kiosks; interpretive signage focusing on park history and the ongoing South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project; and wildlife viewing areas. As part of an expansion along Constitution Drive, Facebook will pay the city $1 million toward maintenance and park improvements at Bedwell, which could be used to hire a docent.

“It’s a bayshore park and we’re next to the preserve, so we have a unique position in the type of park we have,” Schweigart said. “There’s a goldmine of learning out there.”

Mitch Brenner, of San Bruno, flies a glider at Bedwell Bayfront Park in Menlo Park on Oct. 3, 2015. (Norbert von der Groeben / Daily News) 

One sticking point is the ban against drones and radio-controlled aircraft at all city parks. Bedwell used to be known across the region as a go-to destination for model plane enthusiasts.

Silas Kwok, of Belmont, was one of them. He has been lobbying Menlo Park to allow an exemption for model planes, and said he is upset that city officials won’t meet with model craft enthusiasts yet regularly confer with the Friends group.

“We never give up but right now we’re just disappointed they’re unwilling to even sit down and talk with us,” Kwok said. “Most of the concern is about the drones … but gliders and (model) airplanes, some of these things are not that intrusive, especially gliders. The only difference from kites is one is tethered and the other is tethered with a radio signal, (and) a lot of them are as light as a kite.”

Schweigart, who has communicated with Kwok by email, said it’s up to the City Council to issue any exemptions.

“The City Council … said they did not want these things, barring further investigation of the master plan process, and they were very clear on that,” he said.

“What we hate about the drones, frankly, is the noise,” said Friends board member Nancy Borgeson. “You want peace and quiet, not having anything buzzing around you all the time.”

Rose Bickerstaff, a Belle Haven resident who has been involved in discussions of planned changes at the park, said she’s against even banning drones. She said the city should allow them during certain hours and in certain park areas.

“Those drones certainly will not make as much noise as planes going over the park; we get noisy planes all the time,” Bickerstaff said. “Everyone should be able to enjoy the park, it should not be cut off from people with children who want to go out on weekend mornings and fly their (aircraft).”

She said she hopes the park will get emergency call stations, stations with plastic bags and dog poop waste bins, more park benches distributed throughout the park, a park ranger to “cut down on a lot of nonsense that’s going on there” and some form of lighting in the parking lot.

According to Menlo Park police spokeswoman Nicole Acker, there have been 18 vehicle break-ins and one attempted break-in so far this year at the park.

 

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Why Lawyers and Other Industries Will Become Obsolete: You Should Stop Practicing Law Now and Find Another …

Summary: Find out what advances in technology will mean for the future of the law and other industries.

In 1998, Kodak had 170,000 employees and sold 85% of all photo paper worldwide. Within just a few years, their business model disappeared, and they went bankrupt. What happened to Kodak will happen in a lot of industries in the next ten years – and most people won’t see it coming. Did you think in 1998 that three years later you would never take pictures on film again?


  

Yet digital cameras were invented in 1975. The first ones only had 10,000 pixels but followed Moore’s law. So as with all exponential technologies, it was a disappointment for a long time, before it became way superior and got mainstream in only a few short years. It will now happen with Artificial Intelligence, health, autonomous and electric cars, education, 3D printing, agriculture, and jobs. Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution. Welcome to the Exponential Age.

  • Software will disrupt most traditional industries in the next 5-10 years.
  • Uber is just a software tool. They don’t own any cars, and are now the biggest taxi company in the world.
  • Airbnb is now the biggest hotel company in the world, although they don’t own any properties.

Artificial Intelligence: Computers become exponentially better in understanding the world. This year, a computer beat the best Go player in the world, ten years earlier than expected.

In the US, young lawyers already don’t get jobs. Because of IBM Watson, you can get legal advice (so far for more or less basic stuff) within seconds, with 90% accuracy compared with 70% accuracy when done by humans.

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So if you study law, stop immediately. There will be 90% fewer lawyers in the future; only specialists will remain.

Watson already helps nurses diagnosing cancer, four times more accurately than human nurses. Facebook now has a pattern recognition software that can recognize faces better than humans. In 2030, computers will become more intelligent than humans.

Autonomous cars: In 2018 the first self-driving cars will appear for the public. Around 2020, the complete industry will start to be disrupted. You won’t want to own a car anymore. You will call a car with your phone; it will show up at your location and drive you to your destination. You will not need to park it, you only pay for the driven distance and can be productive while driving. Our kids will never get a driver’s license and will never own a car.

It will change our cities, because we will need 90-95% fewer cars for that. We can transform former parking spaces into parks. 1.2 million people die each year in car accidents worldwide. We now have one accident every 60,000 mi (100,000 km), with autonomous driving that will drop to one accident in 6 million mi (10 million km). That will save a million lives each year.

Most car companies will probably become bankrupt. Traditional car companies will try the evolutionary approach and just build a better car, while tech companies (Tesla, Apple, Google) will do the revolutionary approach and build a computer on wheels.

Many engineers from Volkswagen and Audi are completely terrified of Tesla.

Insurance companies will have massive trouble. Without accidents, the insurance will become 100x cheaper. Their car insurance business model will disappear.

Real estate will change. Because if you can work while you commute, people will move further away to live in a more beautiful neighborhood.

Electric cars will become mainstream about 2020. Cities will be less noisy because all new cars will run on electricity. Electricity will become incredibly cheap and clean: Solar production has been on an exponential curve for 30 years, but you can now see the burgeoning impact.

Last year, more solar energy was installed worldwide than fossil-based energy. Energy companies are desperately trying to limit access to the grid to prevent competition from home solar installations, but that can’t last. Technology will take care of that strategy.

With cheap electricity comes cheap and abundant water. Desalination of salt water now only needs 2kWh per cubic meter (@ 0.25 cents). We don’t have scarce water in most places; we only have scarce drinking water. Imagine what will be possible if anyone can have as much clean water they want, for nearly no cost.

Health: The Tricorder X price will be announced this year. There are companies who will build a medical device (called the “Tricorder” from Star Trek) that works with your phone, which takes your retina scan, your blood sample and you breathe into it.

It then analyzes 54 biomarkers that will identify nearly any disease. It will be cheap, so in a few years, everyone on this planet will have access to world-class medical analysis, nearly for free. Goodbye, medical establishment.

3D printing: The price of the cheapest 3D printer came down from $18,000 to $400 within 10 years. In the same time, it became 100 times faster. All major shoe companies have already started 3D printing shoes.

  • Some spare airplane parts are already 3D printed in remote airports. The space station now has a printer that eliminates the need for the large amount of spare parts they used to have in the past.
  • At the end of this year, new smartphones will have 3D scanning possibilities. You can then 3D scan your feet and print your perfect shoe at home.
  • In China, they already 3D printed and built a complete 6-story office building. By 2027, 10% of everything that’s being produced will be 3D printed.

Business opportunities: If you think of a niche you want to go in, ask yourself: “in the future, do you think we will have that?” and if the answer is yes, how can you make that happen sooner?

If it doesn’t work with your phone, forget the idea. And any idea designed for success in the 20th century is doomed to failure in the 21st century.

Work: 70-80% of jobs will disappear in the next 20 years. There will be a lot of new jobs, but it is not clear if there will be enough new jobs in such a small time.

Agriculture: There will be a $100 agricultural robot in the future. Farmers in 3rd world countries can then become managers of their field instead of working all day in their fields.

Aeroponics will need much less water. The first Petri dish produced veal is now available and will be cheaper than cow produced veal in 2018. Right now, 30% of all agricultural surfaces are used for cows. Imagine if we don’t need that space anymore. There are several startups who will bring insect protein to the market shortly. It contains more protein than meat. It will be labeled as “alternative protein source” (because most people still reject the idea of eating insects).

There is an app called “moodies” which can already tell which mood you’re in. By 2020 there will be apps that can tell by your facial expressions if you are lying. Imagine a political debate where it’s being displayed when they’re telling the truth and when they’re not.

Bitcoin may even become the default reserve currency. Of the world.

Longevity: Right now, the average lifespan increases by three months per year. Four years ago, the life span used to be 79 years; now it’s 80 years. The increase itself is increasing, and by 2036, there will be more than a year increase per year. So we all might live for a long, long time, probably way more than 100.

Education: The cheapest smartphones are already at $10 in Africa and Asia. By 2020, 70% of all humans will own a smartphone. That means everyone will have the same access to world class education.

Every child can use Khan Academy for everything a child learns at school in First World countries. It has already been released in Indonesia and it will be released in Arabic, Swahili and Chinese this Summer because there is an enormous potential there. We will give the English app away for free so that children in Africa can become fluent in English within half a year.

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Live Bidding Auction

Date

Saturday, December 3

Time

9:00am – 1:00pm

Location

Wild Ace

Description

Mark your calendars fo our Live Bidding Auction! To be held Saturday December 3,2016 to clear out warehouse and make room for our new Brewery system. Event will be held in Wild Ace Parking lot. Rain or shine. Come out look around. We will be liquidating restaurant equipment and other cool items…..
Some items up for bid: Kegerators, Lawn equipment, Tables and chairs, beer dispensing systems, ovens, model airplanes and beer coolers!!!!!!

More Information

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/1097388977026725/

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Menlo Park planning to add amenities to Bedwell…

Menlo Park’s largest park is poised for some major changes.

The city intends to develop a master plan for Bedwell Bayfront Park that will plot out improvements for the next 25 years.

Friends of Bedwell Bayfront Park, a community group that formed in 2005 to fend off construction of a golf course at the park, wants Bedwell maintained as a passive recreation area. It also is pushing for the return of a ranger to enforce a recent city ban on drones at parks and to crack down on other illegal and dangerous activities. The group also would like Bedwell’s trails improved and a docent brought in to lead tours through the wildlife refuge that borders it on three sides.

Residents who live near the 160-acre park along the Bay say they want to see all that too, plus some extra benches, a learning center, a rebuilt restroom and maintenance of the Great Spirit Path — a Native American-inspired rock sculpture designed by Menlo Park artist Susan Dunlap.

Meanwhile, members of the Academy of Model Aeronautics would like the city to exempt from the drone ban some types of radio-controlled model aircraft, particularly gliders, which one member likened to kites with radio signals. The park hosts an annual kite day.

In October, the City Council authorized spending $200,000 from the 2016-17 capital improvement budget to develop the master plan.

Azalea Mitch, Menlo Park’s senior civil engineer, said the city is pursuing a master plan to “help identify approaches we should be following to make sure we don’t miss (funding) opportunities. … The park has become very popular. It needs care and the funds are not there.”

The city is seeking bids for the master plan work until Dec. 12.  Assistant Community Services Director Derek Schweigart said if the city awards a contract this month, the master plan could be in place by early 2018. It wouldn’t require an environmental review unless major changes are proposed.

Other possible changes mentioned in the bidding documents include park information kiosks; interpretive signage focusing on park history and the ongoing South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project; and wildlife viewing areas. As part of an expansion along Constitution Drive, Facebook will pay the city $1 million toward maintenance and park improvements at Bedwell, which could be used to hire a docent.

“It’s a bayshore park and we’re next to the preserve, so we have a unique position in the type of park we have,” Schweigart said. “There’s a goldmine of learning out there.”

Mitch Brenner, of San Bruno, flies a glider at Bedwell Bayfront Park in Menlo Park on Oct. 3, 2015. (Norbert von der Groeben / Daily News) 

One sticking point is the ban against drones and radio-controlled aircraft at all city parks. Bedwell used to be known across the region as a go-to destination for model plane enthusiasts.

Silas Kwok, of Belmont, was one of them. He has been lobbying Menlo Park to allow an exemption for model planes, and said he is upset that city officials won’t meet with model craft enthusiasts yet regularly confer with the Friends group.

“We never give up but right now we’re just disappointed they’re unwilling to even sit down and talk with us,” Kwok said. “Most of the concern is about the drones … but gliders and (model) airplanes, some of these things are not that intrusive, especially gliders. The only difference from kites is one is tethered and the other is tethered with a radio signal, (and) a lot of them are as light as a kite.”

Schweigart, who has communicated with Kwok by email, said it’s up to the City Council to issue any exemptions.

“The City Council … said they did not want these things, barring further investigation of the master plan process, and they were very clear on that,” he said.

“What we hate about the drones, frankly, is the noise,” said Friends board member Nancy Borgeson. “You want peace and quiet, not having anything buzzing around you all the time.”

Rose Bickerstaff, a Belle Haven resident who has been involved in discussions of planned changes at the park, said she’s against even banning drones. She said the city should allow them during certain hours and in certain park areas.

“Those drones certainly will not make as much noise as planes going over the park; we get noisy planes all the time,” Bickerstaff said. “Everyone should be able to enjoy the park, it should not be cut off from people with children who want to go out on weekend mornings and fly their (aircraft).”

She said she hopes the park will get emergency call stations, stations with plastic bags and dog poop waste bins, more park benches distributed throughout the park, a park ranger to “cut down on a lot of nonsense that’s going on there” and some form of lighting in the parking lot.

According to Menlo Park police spokeswoman Nicole Acker, there have been 18 vehicle break-ins and one attempted break-in so far this year at the park.

 

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Millennial Cognitive Tunnel Syndrome: Why We Miss The Solutions To Our Career Crises

Cognitive tunneling, also known as inattentional blindness, happens when we fail to recognize an unexpected stimulus in plain sight. In some cases, such as Bonin’s, our failure to see something renders the wrong reaction. One study explains cognitive tunneling as, “the individual performing the task simply fails to see what should be plainly visible and thereafter cannot explain his or her error.” A classic depiction of this effect, Bonin’s last words before the plane plunged into the ocean were, “But what’s happening?”

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