Europe wants to be the world’s leading tech power. Andrus Ansip is tasked with …

BRUSSELS—It is easy to get lost in European bureaucratese, with its byzantine designations and overlapping commissioners, vice presidents, and directorates-general. But when it comes to digital policy, the important thing to know is just this: Andrus Ansip is the most powerful person in Europe today. As the commissioner in charge of the “digital single market,” his job is, literally, “to make Europe a world leader in information and communication technology.”

For many outside Europe, this aspiration to become a world leader, combined with ongoing regulatory actions against American tech companies, suggests an aggressive, protectionist Europe willing to engage in battle with US firms to favor its own. In February, America’s president came out and said as much, telling Re/Code that “sometimes the European response here is more commercially driven than anything else.”

That perception came up often when Quartz sat down with Ansip in July for an hour-long interview at his office on the ninth floor of the European Commission headquarters in Brussels. At one point in the chat, Ansip pulled out a sheet from a briefing folder in front of him. “So about those competition cases, I have some figures,” he said, citing numbers from a May speech he delivered at the Brookings Institution in Washington. “Our competition cases here in the EU,” he added, “they are not so much connected with the American companies.”

It’s not about America…

Yet scan the headlines over the past few months, and with the exception of Russia’s Gazprom, each of the big-ticket charges and investigations announced by European regulators have involved American firms: Google, Apple, Amazon, various e-commerce and travel businesses, Hollywood studios, and, most recently, Walt Disney Co.

 “I don’t think we have to accept this kind of business model.” But many of these cases, while seemingly targeting American companies, adhere to an internal logic. Take the recent matters involving Disney and the Hollywood studios. They stand accused of something that has long been illegal in the EU: discriminating between Europeans, either on the basis of price or access to services. In the case of Disney, for example, the company drew complaints that it was charging residents of different countries different ticket prices for Disneyland Paris, and selectively blocking online access to deals that were made available only to consumers in France or Belgium.

“If someone is selling some magazines or hamburgers somewhere, it will be [a] huge scandal if they say, ‘No, those goods are for our own people, not for you, and we are not accepting credit cards issued in your country,’” Ansip says. “It’s illegal in the physical meaning in the European Union. But in [the] digital meaning, they say it’s [the] basis of our business model. I don’t think we have to accept this kind of business model.”

The cases fighting against geo-blocking is part of the EU’s foundational principle of creating an “ever closer union.” A recent agreement over to abolish roaming charges across the EU by 2017 is another example, and one in which Ansip and his staff take great pride. It is all part of the grand project to turn Europe into a single economic entity.

…It’s about Europe

Ansip argues that the the reforms he is putting in place apply to all companies, be they European, American, Japanese, or of any other provenance.

“It’s not fortress Europe, it’s about fair competition, it’s about opportunity. America’s companies, some of them, are much more successful here in the EU than in the USA. That is clear evidence that there is a friendly environment for American companies here in the EU. These companies are very welcome here in the EU but they have to follow EU regulations. Everyone has to,” he says.

 “It’s not fortress Europe, it’s about fair competition, it’s about opportunity.” But any company operating in the European Union today also needs to understand the regulations and tax systems in 28 separate member states. This is a baffling and exhausting process—and one that Ansip hopes to consign to the dustbin.

In May, the European Commission announced a 16-point strategy for turning Europe into a single digital market (pdf). This means Ansip has the mammoth task of tearing down virtual barriers to online trade and commerce—doing in the digital realm, within the commission’s five-year mandate, what the EU gradually achieved in the physical world over half a century.

Ansip’s 16 agenda items are equal parts wish list and to-do list. They also are only the first step in a long and arduous task. By the time roaming charges disappear in 2017, it will have been a decade since the Commission took up the cause. Nonetheless, Ansip is confident of the speed with which he and his colleagues will be able to change things.

“We put together this digital single market strategy within our first six months in the office,” he says. “Our aim is to make all those legislative and non-legislative proposals according to the digital single market [strategy] within this year and next year.”

It is an ambitious timetable, but also a typically European response to a global problem: When confronted with a need to compete with Silicon Valley, the EU’s answer is more rulemaking.

Red tape and paper trails

Ansip is often accused of being robotic in his manner, and it is true that he does a great job of adhering to the party line. Part of that is training: he spent a lifetime as a politician in Estonia, with a nine-year tenure as prime minister, the longest of any European premier. Part of that is perhaps an inclination toward regimen, even outside of work. (Ansip is a keen cyclist, having done 3,115 km by the middle of July, including 400 km after he broke an arm when he trapped a wheel in a grate in June.)

But he’s not so robotic that he always stays on script, or even uses one, on topics that raise his ire. Speaking on the record at a press briefing, he once said, “Once again I would like to say, I hate geo-blocking.” Lately, he has been making noise about the cost of cross-border parcel deliver. A question about digitization more generally elicits an extended rant, involving an example of a long-felt frustration.

 “Yes! You have to bring paper,” says Ansip. “Why? Why do we have to do that?” Both Estonia and Finland have highly developed IT sectors, Ansip explains. The two countries are a short ferry ride away from each other. Yet, each year, 20,000 Estonians working in Finland must return to their home country to gather paper documents for Finnish authorities.

“It means they have to take ferry or airplane, then visit those offices, stay in queues. Then civil servants will print out this digital information on paper, put signature on paper, and then people, very carefully, will bring those documents back to the ferry, back to the airplane, and they bring those documents back to Finland,” Ansip says. “And then, as we know, Finnish civil servant[s], they are really good people; without making any mistakes, they will type this information from paper documents into their digital registers.”

Even the commission itself is wedded to paper-based systems, chimes in Ansip’s spokeswoman, no stranger to the equally stifling bureaucracy at the pan-European level.

“Yes! You have to bring paper,” Ansip confirms. “I asked this a year ago in the European Parliament. We can buy plane tickets online, you can use those tickets electronically, [but] if you have to submit those tickets to the administration of the European Parliament, you have to print them out. Why? Why do we have to do that?”

A will, yes. But a way?

These sorts of low-level annoyances are hardly the stuff of attention-grabbing headlines like antitrust charges against Google, but addressing them is crucial to making Europe more competitive and efficient. Ansip has had some degree of success changing slow-moving bureaucracies before, although that was in Estonia, a country of 1.3 million people to Europe’s 500 million.

Amongst the many digital initiatives he oversaw in his tenure as prime minister, perhaps the most impactful were digital identity and the once-only principle. The former allowed citizens to identify themselves online and has now been extended to non-Estonian citizens. The latter is more revolutionary yet, and an idea Ansip hopes to implement on a European scale: It is the idea that government can only ask for a piece of information once. If a different department needs it again, it must coordinate internally rather than trouble the citizen.

Between the inconveniences it would eliminate and the savings it would generate—the Commission reckons such a system would save about €5 billion a year—it’s hard to imagine that Ansip wouldn’t have the will of the citizenry on his side with this. The question is whether even all that would be enough to force change.

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Drone Near Miss JFK: Two Airplanes Come Within 100 Feet Of A Drone Above New York

Drone Near Miss JFK: Two Airplanes Come Within 100 Feet Of A Drone Above New York

By Ma. Camille Arigo | Aug 03, 2015 06:25 AM EDT


Drone


Two airplanes came as close as 100 feet to a drone while landing at the John F. Kennedy International Airport on Friday afternoon.

The first plane, JetBlue Flight 1843 reported to the tower upon seeing a drone while it was landing  at the airport. The plane was at an altitude of 800 – 900 feet at 2:24 p.m. when a drone passed by the jet’s nose. After almost three hours, another flight reported a similar sighting. Delta Flight 407 from Orlando with 154 passengers reported a drone flying 100 feet beneath its right wing when it was about to land around 5 p.m, DailyMail reported. 

Authorities have not confirmed whether a single drone was reported in both sightings. Both of the flights did not conduct any action against the drones and both landed safely at JFK, according to USA Today

The Delta flight encountered the drone near Floyd Bennett Field in Gateway National Recreation Area. A park ranger said that the area does not allow drones, but some aviation fanatics still fly “radio-controlled propeller crafts and unmanned small jets.” Near the area, there is a place where people with permits can fly their small aircrafts, the ranger said to CNN.

Mary Schiavo, CNN aviation expert, said, “It’s very, very concerning because having drones at JFK or any major airport was illegal even before the latest drone laws came into effect.” She also added that “What is happening now is there are some stiff prosecutions being handed out — including jail time — for lawbreakers. As they people get the word, they won’t do such idiotic things anymore.”

Phil Derner of NYCaviation.com said that these drones may be sucked into an engine and destroy it. “Going into the cockpit window can injure a pilot or even kill a pilot,” he added, according to CNN.

Model aircraft operations for a hobby and recreational purposes should abide several rules. Some of those are not flying beyond 400 feet and not flying within five miles of an airport unless it is allowed by the airport and control tower. Carelessness using unmanned aircrafts resulting in the endangerment of others could result in fines, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. 

Tags: drone, Near Miss JFK, JFK, John F. Kennedy International Airport, JetBlue Flight 1843, Delta Flight 407, Floyd Bennett Field, Gateway National Recreation Area, Mary Schiavo, Phil Derner, Model aircraft

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More debris found on Réunion Island

Malaysian aviation officials said an airplane wing part found last week on the remote Indian Ocean island of Réunion came from the same type of aircraft as Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, raising hope it may offer clues to solving the mysterious disappearance of the jet nearly 17 months ago.

French officials, however, declined to confirm Malaysia’s assertion before an analysis of the part officially begins Wednesday, underscoring the confusion that has emerged in the sprawling, multinational investigation. Local officials in Réunion were also sifting through reports of new debris found on the island, a French territory off the east coast of Madagascar, as scavengers came to the beach looking for other airplane parts that could have washed up on the beach.

Malaysia Transport Minister Liow Tiong Lai identified the plane piece that washed ashore Wednesday as part of a Boeing 777, the same model as Flight 370. Liow said French authorities, Boeing, and the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board agreed that the piece was from a 777. Liow didn’t say whether the part belongs to the missing Flight 370.

If the piece is identified as a Boeing 777 part, it would almost certainly come from Flight 370; only two other Boeing 777s have ever crashed, and neither were anywhere near the Indian Ocean.

Read an expanded version of this article at WSJ.com.

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Searchers scour beaches in hopes of unlocking MH370 mystery

By ANDREW MELDRUM and LORI HINNANT
Associated Press

SAINT-ANDRE, Reunion (AP) – Under a microscope and expert eyes, the wing fragment that washed up on the beach of this volcanic island could yield clues not just to its path through the Indian Ocean, but also to what happened to the airplane it belonged to.

Analysts at the French aviation laboratory where the scrap was headed Friday can glean details from metal stress to see what caused the flap to break off, spot explosive or other chemical traces, and study the sea life that made its home on the wing to pinpoint where it came from.

French authorities have imposed extraordinary secrecy over the 2-meter (6-foot) long piece of wing, putting it under police protection in the hours before it left the island of Reunion. If the fragment is indeed part of the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, it means the wreckage may have drifted thousands of kilometers (miles) across the Indian Ocean to this French island off the east coast of Africa.

Wrapped and loaded as cargo, it was headed to a military aviation laboratory near the city of Toulouse, Europe’s aviation hub.

“With a microscope, that can learn details from the torn metal,” said Xavier Tytelman, a French aviation safety expert. “You can tell whether a crash was more horizontal or vertical … You can extrapolate a lot.”

John Cox, president and CEO of Safety Operating Systems and a former accident investigator, said minute characteristics of the metal could indicate attitude and vertical speed of the aircraft when it impacted.

“It won’t tell you how the plane crashed, but it will be a step in that direction,” Cox said.

Barnacles encrusting the wing’s edges would be studied for clues to plot the wing’s journey through the Indian Ocean, but Tytelman said there could be other microscopic life clinging to the metal or bottled up inside that could further indicate where the wing traveled.

“It’s been 16 months from the crash and everything fits together,” said oceanographer Arnold Gordon of Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. “So I think the probability that it’s from 370 is pretty high.”

The currents from the Indian Ocean flow in a counter-clockwise way that would take a crash from west of Australia to Reunion Island, Gordon said. The amount of barnacles on the debris is consistent with other debris that he’s seen in the ocean for more than a year. And it’s the right type of plane.

Pictures of the “flaperon” show that it is missing its drive arm, which directed up-down movement – but there appears to be relatively mild damage at the location where the drive arm tore away, said William Waldock, a former U.S. Coast Guard officer and a professor at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott, Arizona, who teaches aircraft search and rescue.

“One of the things I guess is a little surprising is how intact the flaperon is,” he said. “It argues that it wasn’t a very violent impact, which goes along with some of theories that it just ran out of gas and glided down.”

The French aviation experts, including a legal expert from the field, will start their inquiry on Wednesday, according to the Paris prosecutor’s office. On Monday, an investigating judge will meet with Malaysian authorities and representatives of the French aviation investigative agency, known as the BEA, according to the statement late Friday.

The statement said a shred of suitcase found near the wing fragment would also undergo forensic testing at a Paris-area government lab, and searchers continued Friday to scour the Reunion coastline for other possible debris, including the man from the beach maintenance crew who found the wing fragment.

Officials hope to have at least some answers soon, keenly aware that families of those on board Flight 370 are desperately awaiting word on the fate of their loved ones.

“The most important part of this whole exercise at the moment is to give some kind of closure to the families,” said Australian Transport Minister Warren Truss, whose country is leading the search for the plane in a desolate stretch of ocean off Australia’s west coast.

Even if the piece is confirmed to be the first confirmed wreckage from Flight 370, there’s no guarantee that investigators can find the plane’s vital black box recorders or other debris. A multinational search effort has come up empty.

Air safety investigators, including one from Boeing, have identified the component as a flaperon from the trailing edge of a Boeing 777 wing, a U.S. official said. The official wasn’t authorized to be publicly named.

Flight 370, which disappeared March 8, 2014, with 239 people on board, is the only missing 777.

Scanning the beach’s distinctive black volcanic sand and stones on Friday, searcher Philippe Sidam picked up a plastic bottle for laundry detergent. “This is from Jakarta, Indonesia,” he said, pointing to the writing on the bottle. “This shows how the ocean’s currents bring material all the way from Indonesia and beyond. That explains how the debris from the Malaysian plane could have reached here.”

Reunion environmental worker Johnny Begue told The Associated Press that he stumbled across the plane part on Wednesday morning while collecting stones to grind spices.

“I knew immediately it was part of an aircraft, but I didn’t realize how important it was, that it could help to solve the mystery of what happened to the Malaysian jet,” Begue told the AP.

Australian officials expressed skepticism that the suitcase fragment was associated with the wing part. Truss, the transport minister, noted that there did not appear to be any marine life attached to the suitcase, indicating it probably hadn’t been in the water for long. But he described the wing part as a major lead.

Investigators have found what may be a maintenance number on the wing piece, which may help investigators figure out what plane it belongs to, Truss said.

Truss expects French investigators will also try to determine how the part separated from the rest of the aircraft, and whether it shows evidence of fire or other damage, which might explain how the plane crashed.

Ocean modeling predicted that currents would eventually carry any floating wreckage to the African coast from its suspected crash site.

Hinnant reported from Paris; Kristen Gelineau in Sydney, Rod McGuirk in Canberra, Australia, Ian Mader in Beijing, Eileen Ng in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Joan Lowy and Seth Borenstein in Washington; and Greg Keller in Toulouse, France, contributed.

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Aerobatic Club hosts weekend of flying fun (23 photos)

Sunday, August 02, 2015   by: Jeff Klassen

Seventeen competitors took part in the 11th annual Northern Ontario International Miniature Aerobatic Club Challenge (NOIC) on Saturday, August 1, 2015 in Sault Ste. Marie.

2015 was the first year the event was hosted by the Sault Ste. Marie model airplane Radio Controlled Club  (Soo Modellers) who won a bidding to hold it after Sudbury had ”ownership problems with their field,” said Model Aeronautics Association of Canada Northern Ontario zone director Kevin McGrath.

Competitors drove in from as far as southern Ontario and lower parts of Michigan to compete in five rounds (and possibly more if time permitted) at skill levels ranging from basic to unlimited.

Each round competitor demonstrated a variety of tricks, spins, dives, and other maneuvers while being scored on these ‘sequences’ by judges.

Soo Modeller’s President Craig Knight likened the competition, for the layperson, to figure skating as “the challenge is perfecting the elements in your own routine” as opposed to battling another opponent.

More than 20 aircraft took part in the event.

They were 25 to 45 percent scale models of piloted competition aerobatic aircraft, the kind typically seen at airshows, and are some of the biggest model airplanes there are.

Knight says the model airplanes range in cost from a few thousand to upwards of $10,000 dollars and can take anywhere from 40 hours to 6-8 months to build.

Although awards and rankings will be assigned, Knight says model airplane events are “less formal” than other competitions.

“We’re a hobby, we’re supposedly having fun. We’re not [competitive] like a hockey tournament,” said Knight.

The event was held at the Soo Modellers’ airfield located at Leigh’s Bay Road and Baseline, an airfield that McGrath says is probably one of the top 10 out of about 400 model airplane fields nationwide.

McGrath said the field is approximately 150×100 meters and was originally a private airfield for the Algoma Steel plant.

The concrete floor of the old hanger is still present and covered in weeds just beside the parking area.

McGrath says that, with their approximate $1 million annual budge gained mostly from registration fees, MAAC insures its pilots.

“Each [pilot] here is insured for $7.5 million for public liability [in case they] hit somebody, “ said McGrath.

Because pilots are just so careful and take it “very seriously,” it is incredibly unlikely a collision will happen, he added.

“Its an  anomaly if they crash. If you have a $10,000 airplane out there, you typically don’t crash,” added Knight.

Amanda Jeffries, 14, who is the only female pilot with Soo Modellers (although she says other clubs have more female pilots), talked about what sort of person might want to get into the hobby, which is more socially focused than competition focused.

“Getting into this sport you have to be an overall really cool person. You have to know what you are doing, be friendly to everyone else, and just have fun basically, ” said Jeffries.

The clubs oldest member at 82, Clarence Boyre, has been involved in model airplanes since the 70s and said that if someone wanted to get into the hobby it might cost them around $650 to start up.

“You just need a lot of practice to be good, but you don’t have to be good to enjoy it,” said Boyre.

As of 2 p.m. Saturday, the first place contenders by class were Steve Ruxton in basic, Bill Teeter in intermediate, and Bryan Mailloux in unlimited.

The event will continue on Sunday and competition results will be released in the coming days at mini-aic.com

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Hopes high wing flap will shed light on Flight 370 mystery

This image taken from video, shows a piece of debris from a plane, Wednesday, July 29, 2015, in Saint-Andre, Reunion. Air safety investigators, one of them a Boeing investigator, have identified the component as a flaperon from the trailing edge of a Boeing 777 wing, a U.S. official said. Flight 370, which disappeared March 8, 2014, with 239 people on board, is the only 777 known to be missing. (Reunion 1ere via AP) FRANCE OUT

— Under a microscope and expert eyes, the wing fragment that washed up on the beach of this volcanic island could yield clues not just to its path through the Indian Ocean, but also to what happened to the airplane it belonged to.

Analysts at the French aviation laboratory where the scrap was headed Friday can glean details from metal stress to see what caused the flap to break off, spot explosive or other chemical traces, and study the sea life that made its home on the wing to pinpoint where it came from.

French authorities have imposed extraordinary secrecy over the 2-meter (6-foot) long piece of wing, putting it under police protection in the hours before it left the island of Reunion. If the fragment is indeed part of the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, it means the wreckage may have drifted thousands of kilometers (miles) across the Indian Ocean to this French island off the east coast of Africa.

Wrapped and loaded as cargo, it was headed to a military aviation laboratory near the city of Toulouse, Europe’s aviation hub.

“With a microscope, that can learn details from the torn metal,” said Xavier Tytelman, a French aviation safety expert. “You can tell whether a crash was more horizontal or vertical … You can extrapolate a lot.”

John Cox, president and CEO of Safety Operating Systems and a former accident investigator, said minute characteristics of the metal could indicate attitude and vertical speed of the aircraft when it impacted.

“It won’t tell you how the plane crashed, but it will be a step in that direction,” Cox said.

Barnacles encrusting the wing’s edges would be studied for clues to plot the wing’s journey through the Indian Ocean, but Tytelman said there could be other microscopic life clinging to the metal or bottled up inside that could further indicate where the wing traveled.

“It’s been 16 months from the crash and everything fits together,” said oceanographer Arnold Gordon of Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. “So I think the probability that it’s from 370 is pretty high.”

The currents from the Indian Ocean flow in a counter-clockwise way that would take a crash from west of Australia to Reunion Island, Gordon said. The amount of barnacles on the debris is consistent with other debris that he’s seen in the ocean for more than a year. And it’s the right type of plane.

Pictures of the “flaperon” show that it is missing its drive arm, which directed up-down movement — but there appears to be relatively mild damage at the location where the drive arm tore away, said William Waldock, a former U.S. Coast Guard officer and a professor at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott, Arizona, who teaches aircraft search and rescue.

“One of the things I guess is a little surprising is how intact the flaperon is,” he said. “It argues that it wasn’t a very violent impact, which goes along with some of theories that it just ran out of gas and glided down.”

The French aviation experts, including a legal expert from the field, will start their inquiry on Wednesday, according to the Paris prosecutor’s office. On Monday, an investigating judge will meet with Malaysian authorities and representatives of the French aviation investigative agency, known as the BEA, according to the statement late Friday.

The statement said a shred of suitcase found near the wing fragment would also undergo forensic testing at a Paris-area government lab, and searchers continued Friday to scour the Reunion coastline for other possible debris, including the man from the beach maintenance crew who found the wing fragment.

Officials hope to have at least some answers soon, keenly aware that families of those on board Flight 370 are desperately awaiting word on the fate of their loved ones.

“The most important part of this whole exercise at the moment is to give some kind of closure to the families,” said Australian Transport Minister Warren Truss, whose country is leading the search for the plane in a desolate stretch of ocean off Australia’s west coast.

Even if the piece is confirmed to be the first confirmed wreckage from Flight 370, there’s no guarantee that investigators can find the plane’s vital black box recorders or other debris. A multinational search effort has come up empty.

Air safety investigators, including one from Boeing, have identified the component as a flaperon from the trailing edge of a Boeing 777 wing, a U.S. official said. The official wasn’t authorized to be publicly named.

Flight 370, which disappeared March 8, 2014, with 239 people on board, is the only missing 777.

Scanning the beach’s distinctive black volcanic sand and stones on Friday, searcher Philippe Sidam picked up a plastic bottle for laundry detergent. “This is from Jakarta, Indonesia,” he said, pointing to the writing on the bottle. “This shows how the ocean’s currents bring material all the way from Indonesia and beyond. That explains how the debris from the Malaysian plane could have reached here.”

Reunion environmental worker Johnny Begue told The Associated Press that he stumbled across the plane part on Wednesday morning while collecting stones to grind spices.

“I knew immediately it was part of an aircraft, but I didn’t realize how important it was, that it could help to solve the mystery of what happened to the Malaysian jet,” Begue told the AP.

Australian officials expressed skepticism that the suitcase fragment was associated with the wing part. Truss, the transport minister, noted that there did not appear to be any marine life attached to the suitcase, indicating it probably hadn’t been in the water for long. But he described the wing part as a major lead.

Investigators have found what may be a maintenance number on the wing piece, which may help investigators figure out what plane it belongs to, Truss said.

Truss expects French investigators will also try to determine how the part separated from the rest of the aircraft, and whether it shows evidence of fire or other damage, which might explain how the plane crashed.

Ocean modeling predicted that currents would eventually carry any floating wreckage to the African coast from its suspected crash site.

___

Hinnant reported from Paris; Kristen Gelineau in Sydney, Rod McGuirk in Canberra, Australia, Ian Mader in Beijing, Eileen Ng in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Joan Lowy and Seth Borenstein in Washington; and Greg Keller in Toulouse, France, contributed.

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Iran to buy 90 airplanes a year to refurbish civil fleet

1 August 2015, 17:34

Turkmenistan, Pakistan to hold talks on TAPI gas pipeline

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